July 27-29, 2017 // Upper Butte, Montana

Get Here!

BUTTE, MONTANA

GETTING TO EVEL KNIEVEL DAYS

LODGING

There is a wide variety of accommodation in the area, we recommend making your reservations as soon as possible. Click here for lodging options.

CITY OF BUTTE

SILVER BOW MONTANA

The City of Butte webpage has quickly become the go-to portal for everything this great place has to offer. From recreation to events, policy to protocol, this website is a one stop shop for guests and locals alike!

“I’ve been all over the world and done things that most don’t have the guts to try. I’ve met and talked with people from every place on the planet and when it comes down to the best character on earth, you never have to go any farther than Butte. Those are the best people on Earth.”    -Evel Knievel

TRAVEL

DRIVING DIRECTIONS

From West/South: Take I-90 East, merging left onto I-115 City Center. This slows down to a T-intersection with Montana St. Turn left on Montana St (going up the hill) to Uptown Butte and the festival.

From North: Take I-15 South and merge right onto I-15 South/I-90 West. Take the next exit, Harrison Ave. exit #127 north. Follow Harrison Ave. into Butte, about 1.5 miles. Turn right onto Utah St.–the first light just going under a railroad bridge. Take Utah St. (turning to Arizona) uphill to the festival.

From East: Heading west on I-90, take the Harrison Ave. exit #127 north. Follow Harrison Ave. into Butte, about 1.5 miles. Turn right onto Utah St.–the first light just going under a railroad bridge. Take Utah St. (turning to Arizona) uphill to the festival.

THE HISTORY OF BUTTE

ButteOver a dozen of the headframes still stand over the mine shafts, and the city still contains thousands of historic commercial and residential buildings from the boom times, which, especially in the Uptown section, give it a very old-fashioned appearance, with many commercial buildings not fully occupied. As with many industrial cities, tourism and services, especially health care (Butte’s St. James Hospital has Southwest Montana’s only major trauma center), are rising as primary employers. Many areas of the city, especially the areas near the old mines, show signs of urban blight but a recent influx of investors and an aggressive campaign to remedy blight has led to a renewed interest in restoring property in Uptown Butte’s historic district, which was expanded in 2006 to include parts of Anaconda and is now the largest National Historic Landmark District in the United States with nearly 6,000 contributing properties.

ButteMinesA century after the era of intensive mining and smelting, the area around the city remains an environmental issue. Arsenic and heavy metals such as lead are found in high concentrations in some spots affected by old mining, and for a period of time in the 1990s the tap water was unsafe to drink due to poor filtration and decades-old wooden supply pipes. Efforts to improve the water supply have taken place in the past few years, with millions of dollars being invested to upgrade water lines and repair infrastructure. Environmental research and clean-up efforts have contributed to the diversification of the local economy, and signs of vitality remain, including a multi-million dollar polysilicon manufacturing plant locating nearby in the 1990s and the city’s recognition and designation in the late 1990s as an All-American City and also as one of the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s Dozen Distinctive Destinations in 2002. In 2004, Butte received another economic boost as well as international recognition as the location for the Hollywood film Don’t Come Knocking, directed by renowned director Wim Wenders and released throughout the world in 2006.